Initial D World - Discussion Board / Forums
   
Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )Resend Validation Email

DJ Panel ( Server Stats )   Song History   Initial D World Chat Room (Discord)   Broadband Stream
RADIO BROADCAST » streaming at 96kbps with 10 unique listeners, playing Mood Music

       

  Important Rules
Do not post any obscene material. (i.e. - nudity, explicit graphic situations ... etc.)
Put a viewer discretion somewhere in your topic title / description when posting topic(s) that others might find offensive. (i.e. - Not Work Safe, PG13 ... etc.)

FORUM MODERATOR : FORUM MODERATOR

 

Views: 1,600  ·  Replies: 12 
> Going Digital-Finally, Camera Reviews/Recommendations
Cecilia
  Posted: Mar 2 2015, 10:44 AM


Easy to please. Since day one.
**********

Group: Advanced Members
Posts: 948
Member No.: 31,385
Joined: Dec 19th 2008
Location: Ames, IA





I have given in to the digital age of photography and would like to purchase a Dslr. Any reviews, opinions, and recommendations are welcome!

I plan to go abroad in two years' time (I'll open another thread for that soon) and would like some help in choosing something that will allow me to take portraits and landscape photos with as much manual control when I want it and includes settings for when I don't.

I'm interested in buying new or previously loved cameras.



Thank you!

[ Post made via Mobile Device ]
Nomake Wan
Posted: Mar 2 2015, 12:47 PM


ShiMACHaze
**********

Group: Advanced Members
Posts: 19,508
Member No.: 5,394
Joined: Feb 5th 2005
Location: Drydock





Contact Matt Spencer (am3pkcet) on Facebook.

[ Post made via Mobile Device ]
Proud Contributor of IDW Forums and the Music Section Revival Project
kyonpalm
Posted: Mar 2 2015, 12:54 PM


Professional Amateur
Group Icon

Group: ADMINISTRATOR
Posts: 10,525
Member No.: 30,882
Joined: Oct 16th 2008
Location: Laniakea





I would recommend my Canon Powershot SX260HS to anyone. Sensation! and Perry can attest to its near-pro-level quality. Not sure how my model stacks up against yours, though - you may have mine beat already.
Proud Contributor of the Music Section Revival Project
Spaz
Posted: Mar 2 2015, 01:01 PM


Just a guy towing a car across the country to chase a dream.
Group Icon

Group: FORUM MODERATOR
Posts: 9,268
Member No.: 30,193
Joined: Jul 25th 2008
Location: Plymouth, MN





I generally suggest for cameras the same thing I suggest about cars: Try a few and get what you like.

I'm a Canon guy. I don't understand Nikons. I don't understand how people can use them with any ease, but many do. So really, if you ask me about cameras, I won't say a single good thing about Nikons because I've never had a good experience trying to use one. But that doesn't mean that you won't.

There are a ton of important things that factor into camera choice though; Cost, sensor size, weight, feel in your hands, ease of use... It all matters. If the inputs to set up the shot don't come naturally to you on a specific body, you'll miss shots of opportunity. If it's too heavy, you'll be tempted to leave it at home, or in your bag, etc. If it doesn't fit in your hands well, you may not compose photos well or may decide not to take them because you subconsciously don't like how awkward it is.

Just go try a bunch of cameras and see what you like and what you don't, mull it over, and then make your choice. A proper camera shop will understand the process and not just try to make a sale.

And definitely don't get sucked into an ebay auction with a good body and a bunch of lenses for cheap... You'll end up with a good body and a bunch of crap glass.
Proud Contributor of Initial D World Forums
Perry
Posted: Mar 2 2015, 01:16 PM


Like an eagle!
Group Icon

Group: SITE OWNER
Posts: 7,985
Member No.: 1
Joined: Sep 15th 2002
Location: San Leandro, California





Get a used entry level body and invest on glass instead. Modern DSLR bodies are pretty much the same. I recommend a used 40D body with 50mm 1.8 for starter. 40D can be had for less than $200 ( http://sfbay.craigslist.org/nby/pho/4899364645.html ) and 50mm 1.8 can be had for $100. Then later on, you can get more quality glass. $300 isn't so bad to start going digital. smile.gif
Proud Contributor of the Music Section Revival Project
Cecilia
  Posted: Mar 2 2015, 01:18 PM


Easy to please. Since day one.
**********

Group: Advanced Members
Posts: 948
Member No.: 31,385
Joined: Dec 19th 2008
Location: Ames, IA





Thanks N1! I shall do that. smile.gif

Kyon, I bought my Canon for the processor. It was one of the better ones for its pricepoint at the time despite having fewer megapixels.

I remember asking the architects I worked with back in 2007 what camera they used when they shared gorgeous photos of the sites they'd designed. They pointed me to the Canon Powershot. smile.gif

I'm quite happy with it, but I'd like a Dslr, preferably without the LCD viewfinder.

I looked into getting a waterproof case for it, but it's priced at $250+. Even the telephoto lens for it is quite pricey!



[ Post made via Mobile Device ]
Mr. Shine
Posted: Mar 2 2015, 06:19 PM


Troll King
**********

Group: Advanced Members
Posts: 2,058
Member No.: 3,757
Joined: Oct 18th 2004
Location: Ankh-Morpork





If you want a proper, decent DSLR then you're pretty much looking at Canon or Nikon. Nikon have far superior sensor technology at the moment (and arguably have done for a while) but that probably won't matter unless you're a pixel peeper, although having the ability to recover ridiculous amounts of shadow detail is very helpful if you make a mistake. Canon have arguably better control layout and generally nicer looking colour rendition.

If you're going Nikon I'd recommend something like a D3200. If you're going Canon I'd recommend something like a 650D. Get one with a standard kit zoom lens, and if you really want to buy a second lens get a fixed/prime lens with a focal length between about 24mm and 35mm. 30mm is ideal for Canon while 35mm is ideal for Nikon.

If you want to look at something lightweight then you could also look at Fuji and Olympus. I owned a Fuji X-T1 until I moved back to Nikon with my D750. The X-T1 is not an SLR and does not have a mirror or standard viewfinder, but is mirrorless, though does have an (incredibly pleasant to use) electronic viewfinder. One of the further advantages of mirrorless cameras is the ability to see a "preview" of what the actual image will look directly from the sensor to the LCD/electronic viewfinder as you're composing and changing settings, unlike with a DSLR.

If I were to start all over again with the knowledge I have now, I'd buy a D3200 with 18-55mm kit lens and a Nikon 35mm f/1.8 lens, and this is my recommendation. If you want to have a longer zoom lens as well then look for a twin lens kit or add in a 55-200mm f/4.5-5.6 lens or similar.
SgtXDNX
Posted: Mar 2 2015, 07:20 PM


Goddamn Electric
**********

Group: Advanced Members
Posts: 2,129
Member No.: 23,073
Joined: Feb 2nd 2007
Location: Fort Kickass





QUOTE (Mr. Shine @ 1 hour, 0 minutes ago)
If you're going Nikon I'd recommend something like a D3200. If you're going Canon I'd recommend something like a 650D. Get one with a standard kit zoom lens, and if you really want to buy a second lens get a fixed/prime lens with a focal length between about 24mm and 35mm. 30mm is ideal for Canon while 35mm is ideal for Nikon.

Can totally vouch for the 650D being a great entry-level camera, I've had nothing but good things to say about it since I bought it. biggrin.gif
Proud Contributor of Initial D World Forums
Nomake Wan
Posted: Mar 2 2015, 07:37 PM


ShiMACHaze
**********

Group: Advanced Members
Posts: 19,508
Member No.: 5,394
Joined: Feb 5th 2005
Location: Drydock





QUOTE (SgtXDNX @ 17 minutes, 13 seconds ago)
Can totally vouch for the 650D being a great entry-level camera, I've had nothing but good things to say about it since I bought it. biggrin.gif

Yeah I kinda want one too for how cheap they are apparently. I've always wanted a 7D for its video features but...
Proud Contributor of IDW Forums and the Music Section Revival Project
Mr. Shine
Posted: Mar 2 2015, 10:23 PM


Troll King
**********

Group: Advanced Members
Posts: 2,058
Member No.: 3,757
Joined: Oct 18th 2004
Location: Ankh-Morpork





QUOTE (Nomake Wan @ 2 hours, 45 minutes ago)
I've always wanted a 7D for its video features but...

This is a good point. If you think you may be interested in getting seriously (whether as a hobby or further) into video then skip the others and go for Canon. They're just more video-friendly.

Another thing worth noting is buying a camera on which you can use old or adapted manual focus lenses. Older manual focus lenses can be an affordable way to some very good lenses. I've even got my eyes on a modern manual focus 40mm lens for my Nikon D750.
Cecilia
  Posted: Mar 2 2015, 10:40 PM


Easy to please. Since day one.
**********

Group: Advanced Members
Posts: 948
Member No.: 31,385
Joined: Dec 19th 2008
Location: Ames, IA





Oh wow! Thank you all so much for the incredible info! I shall sample all of your suggested cameras and see what suits me. smile.gif

I'm really looking forward to getting into photography again, especially since I'd like to fill my empty aoartment walls with photographs of our adventures!

This spring, my grandpa and I will be taking scenic trips around Iowa (and hopefully classes) to gain some experience.

[ Post made via Mobile Device ]
Spaz
Posted: Mar 3 2015, 09:26 AM


Just a guy towing a car across the country to chase a dream.
Group Icon

Group: FORUM MODERATOR
Posts: 9,268
Member No.: 30,193
Joined: Jul 25th 2008
Location: Plymouth, MN





A 650D is a newer step up model from mine. Should be a good choice for starting out.
Proud Contributor of Initial D World Forums
pkzipper
Posted: Mar 25 2015, 04:40 AM


Shmuck
*

Group: Members
Posts: 8
Member No.: 45,238
Joined: Feb 14th 2015
Location: Update Profile





Most entry level DSLR nowadays offer a lot compared to a body say 10 years ago. With that said, what you're paying more for higher end DSLR's and pro-body DSLR's is better noise handling, faster FPS, and other bells & whistles you need for professional work.

With that said, anyone starting out, just get any entry level DSLR whether it's Nikon D3100 body, Canon t5i, etc but invest in a good lens you'll have for many years to come.

So where the lens selection come into play is what you'll be shooting. Most entry level DSLR's come with a kit lens that offer say 18mm up to 200mm in one lens. That's great and all for starting out but while the optical quality is good but will start to struggle in low light situations as the images may not be sharp as professional lens that collect more light and sharp "wide open". These kit lenses also don't have shallow depth of field as the lens are often in the f3.5-f5 range where pro lens can be wide open as f1.2 (and $$$$). What I mean with shallow depth of field is that creamy blurred out background with portraits that's achieve with more expensive lens. It has everything to do with the lens size and design so there are more glass elements, built more rugged and end up costing more often times.

Landscape for example it's common to have wide angle lens but you can still shoot with telephoto depending on the subject. Now let's say you get the Canon t5i for $700 on Amazon with 18-55mm STM kit lens.

Just remember t5i is crop body so 18-55 becomes 28.8-88mm effective with the x1.6; crop sensor has it's benefits contrary to popular belief. So the 28.8mm is wide enough to shoot landscape and 88mm can do 3/4 body portraits. The "focal length" all depends on the subject, what you're shooting and how you're controlling the image in the end.

Now the 18-55mm lens that's listed says f3.5-f5.6 which isn't horrible but whenever the f-number is bigger, the less light the lens can collect. f2.8 would be better (smaller f-number = more light) while you can spend money to get f1.2; again, it all depends on your needs. Just because you have f1.2 lens doesn't mean that's you have the best lens possible. Like Canon's 85mm f/1.2L cost over $1,700 and is superb for portraits but it's not the fastest lens. It's really designed for portraits. What you're really spending is what the lens can do. 18-55mm STM (STM for smooth video focusing) is a general walk around lens. It'll take great photos as long as you have enough light. You have a bigger lens that can collect more light with say 24-70mm f2.8 where you'll spend easy $1,000+ even with aftermarket brand like Tamron and up to $2,000 for Canon/Nikon equivalent.

For example I've shot with crop body like Canon 20D & 60D and moved to full sensor Canon 6D. If I'm doing headshots for example I'll use between 100-200mm with my Tamron 70-200mm f2.8 lens. When I do astrophotography, I use my Tamron 17-35mm f2.8 lens wide open to collect as much light as possible. Canon 6D is the low light King BUT there's always a limitation or should I say the way these DSLR's are made and marketed. Canon 6D is NOT for sports photographers or wildlife photographers. They often use a body that have little reach and has faster shooting capabilities. The new Canon 7D MKII is a fine example; shoots at 10fps, has amazing auto focus capabilities as well as great video functionality for videographers. But the body doesn't handle low light nor it has Wifi capabilities and features that come with the 6D.

So like in May there's an airshow in Mass; I'll bring my 6D for wide angle shots but will likely rent the 7D MKII for capturing the jets. Most of those photographers on the sidelines at professional sporting events all shoot with Canon 1DX that's capable of shooting at 14fps. They need that kind of body for both capturing the right moment, is rugged and can handle the daily abuse. The big white L-lens also is made to take such abuse aside from collecting large amount of light for any given focal length so it does end up costing A LOT of money.

Rambling on what I can suggest, get t5i body or even an older body. Lens wise, you're going to have to decide as again, most lens that try to sell wide angle & telephoto in one package is never going to be good as prime lenses and with limited range. You'll often have wedding photographers that carry two bodies with 24-70mm & 70-200mm lens. You can buy a prime lens between 18-50mm for landscapes and full body portraits. For 3/4 body & headshot as well as having more reach, 85mm to 200mm will satisfy your needs.

Feel free to ask me any questions tongue.gif I've been doing photography for over 15 years and the last 10 years have been with a DSLR.