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Views: 2,169  ·  Replies: 18 
> Looking for Automotive Theory Resources
Kiroshino
  Posted: Mar 24 2010, 09:55 PM


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Since I was young, I've been curious about what thought went into the process of making a vehicle. Unfortunately, the texts that I found at the library were usually limited to basic maintenance or automotive history rather than design. With the lack of available resources and understanding of complex elements, my interest dwindled over the years.

Recently, my interest has been renewed. I acknowledge that the best way to learn this stuff is through experience and having someone qualified teach it to you in person, but are there any specific books, magazines, videos, or other media that you can recommend as a good resource for getting at least a basic understanding about automotive theory such as those involved in:

Aerodynamics and cooling (ie NACA ducts, functional rear wings)
Suspension and handling (ie toe-in, toe-out, tires/wheels)
Performance (ie engine, gears, transmission)
Engine cooling (different systems)
Driving techniques (ie weight transfer)
etc.?

Thanks,

-Kiro

Suggestions

Aerodynamics
http://www.up22.com/Aerodynamics.htm
MR2OC Aerodynamics Glossary
Aerodynamics In Car Racing
Race Car Aerodynamics: Designing for Speed by Joseph Katz
Competition Car Downforce: A Practical Handbook by Simon McBeath

Driving Techniques
http://www.speedsecrets.com/

General
Automotive Chassis Systems by James D. Halderman
Automotive Engine Performance by James D. Halderman
Automotive Technology: Principles, Diagnosis, and Service by James D. Halderman

This post has been edited by Kiroshino on Jun 17 2010, 08:05 AM
MetalMan777
Posted: Mar 24 2010, 10:10 PM


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I know books exist, but I learned most of this stuff from getting underneath my car and doing it.


That's not much help. For performance engine tuning theory, pick up just about any book on tuning a particular car/engine. I have one on Performance Mopar V8's, and it's pretty cool. It's got chapters on oil systems, boring, stroking, balancing, cooling, pretty much everything in that book. It doesn't go into huge detail, but it digs deep enough to get you started and at least know enough to apply it. I got that and a couple other books at Summit Racing parts, that's nowhere near New Jersey, but you can get stuff off their website or similar sites.

Muscle car based books are good. American V8's are all pretty big, cleanly designed and offer plenty of room to work. It makes sense then, that the books would examine all sorts of parts and systems that are more complicated on smaller engines today. Even if the practice is more complicated now, the theory's all still true.
Kiroshino
  Posted: Mar 24 2010, 10:58 PM


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A guy actually talked about Summit Racing at the MR2 meet last night (a few hours ago). Place almost sounds legendary. XD

What I fear is that if I buy one of those books, only a very small portion would be explaining and discussing the theory behind it. Preferably, I would like to have a dedicated resource that focuses on one or a small spectrum of related theories that could potentially lead to advanced discussions of a topic.

There are basically three reasons behind my inquiry:
1) Because I'm interested
2) Because I want to remove the bias from ads and blind support (ie "I can't afford it. It must be good.")
3) Because I'd like to be able to understand and add something to an automotive conversation rather than just nod as if I get what is being discussed

Don't have time to take a class in this, so I figured that reading/watching a credible and informative resource would be more convenient and adequate to at least get the basics if not more.
greatwillies
Posted: Jun 10 2010, 11:51 PM


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I also can say that , lots of book of the automated theory but thats not the enough material for you. You can use that as a reference and at the same time you should take the extra knowledge from the experienced people who is working from long ago in this field. If you do this then and then your knowledge will be increased.
Kiroshino
  Posted: Jun 12 2010, 12:59 PM


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Unfortunately, I am the most experienced individual in my circle of friends... which isn't good, since if you've read my other posts, I have no idea what I'm talking about most of the time. :/

After I get my AW11 back on the road and learn to drive manual, I'm hoping to try out autoX or even attend one of the local beginner drifting sessions to make some friends and get some driving and automotive advice.

On topic, though, I did pick up two free automotive books a few weeks back:

TechOne: Basic Automotive Service & Maintenance
TechOne: Automotive Brakes

I haven't read too much of them yet, but although they don't go in depth, they have been able to provide a good overview of automotive technology and other basic stuff.
JaeMok
Posted: Jun 12 2010, 06:57 PM


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I'm sort of in the same hole as you. I know more than my friends but I'm still a noob.

That's why I'm planning on taking an automotive course at city college. I do not plan on being an automotive technician.
Kiroshino
  Posted: Jun 13 2010, 06:21 AM


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I don't think they offer an automotive course at my college, though they do have a SAE club (Thir13teen is in it) that I may or may not join. Since I'll have a job during school, it'll be even harder for me to participate in any club activities during the weekday.

I do not plan on being an automotive technician either. Dabbling in something doesn't mean you need to devote your life to it, unless that's really what you're into. For me, I just like to drive and figured I should know more about cars and maintenance if I want to be able to improve and keep on driving.
avraell
Posted: Jun 13 2010, 08:40 PM


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"Speed Secrets" had some basics on suspension set ups and aerodynamics, but again, fairly basic - still, it's well-written and would give you more detailed stuff to look into. Book made me realize what a noob I really am.
Kiroshino
  Posted: Jun 14 2010, 08:13 AM


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http://www.speedsecrets.com/

"Speed Secrets" looks like a series more about driving technique and driver mentality than anything else, which is also something I'm looking for. If they contain basic automotive theory and such, all the better. Thanks. smile.gif
JKaiba
Posted: Jun 14 2010, 02:15 PM


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I'm guessing you've read some of the SAE prep stuff? If not I'd give it a go- read the book on engine and chassis published by Prentice Hall and written by James D Halderman. It's pretty much all the basics. The SAE style quizzes they have in there are useful for jogging your memory if you are teh noobz0rx mechanic.
avraell
Posted: Jun 14 2010, 09:15 PM


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QUOTE
http://www.speedsecrets.com/

"Speed Secrets" looks like a series more about driving technique and driver mentality than anything else, which is also something I'm looking for. If they contain basic automotive theory and such, all the better. Thanks.


I actually meant the book by Ross Bentley:
http://www.amazon.com/Speed-Secrets-Ross-B...76578875&sr=8-1

Dunno about the website, seems like some relative of his is running it.
Kiroshino
  Posted: Jun 15 2010, 05:03 AM


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JKaiba: I actually haven't. I am very much "teh newbie" when it comes to anything car related. I'll definitely look into it. wink2.gif

Would you recommend all of Halderman's books? http://www.amazon.com/James-D.-Halderman/e/B001ITVQAK/

avraell: We're on the same page... no pun intended. XD

http://www.speedsecrets.com/PRODUCTS/Speed...99/Default.aspx

This post has been edited by Kiroshino on Jun 15 2010, 05:06 AM
JKaiba
Posted: Jun 16 2010, 02:21 PM


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Principles, diagnosis and service; Automotive engine performance; and one of the chassis books I highly recommend for basics.
Kiroshino
  Posted: Jun 17 2010, 08:05 AM


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Thanks. smile.gif

Added to my list.
jvalentine
Posted: Jul 11 2010, 09:36 AM


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This comprehensive textbook covers the theory of operation, diagnostics, and repair procedures for each system and subsystem of late model domestic and imported automobiles and light trucks. The new edition is published in full color for the first time, including all new step-by-step photo sequences to help users visualize and identify common repair procedures. The technical content has been both updated and improved. An emphasis is placed upon providing the best possible coverage of key topics virtually all automotive technicians must know electricity-electronics, engine performance, steering and suspension and brakes. "Hot Topics" such as the use of diagnostic equipment (including lab scopes), hazardous materials management, OBDII, electronic automatic transmissions, anti-lock braking systems, air-conditioning refrigerants and retrofitting, passive restraint systems and many others have been expanded and updated. Key new teaching tools, including 100 full-color transparency acetates, and Power- Point based lecture outlines, have been added to make the teaching package the best available. This textbook is also accompanied by an extensive Tech Manual that includes an all-new electronic study guide.ALSO AVAILABLELab Manual, ISBN: 0-7668-0674-X
Bubs
Posted: Jul 21 2010, 01:37 PM


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I personally have a copy of Automotive Technology: Principles, Diagnosis, and Service by James D. Halderman. Overall I have found it to be a great resource.
Kiroshino
  Posted: Jul 23 2010, 06:23 PM


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Local B&N didn't have any Halderman books in stock, so I looked for Speed Secrets... and realized that I had read that book already, or at least read half of it and skimmed through the rest. XD

Many of the "secrets" were already second nature for me. I still haven't gotten through the whole book yet, though.

Anyway, I sat down and started reading Secrets of Solo Racing: Expert Techniques for Autocrossing and Time Trials. Everything that was merely mentioned in Speed Secrets was put into more depth in Secrets of Solo Racing. Obviously, it was geared toward autoX and time trials, but the information was good nonetheless. Didn't get too far into it before having to leave, but now I have something to practice while driving: proper steering.
flohtingPoint
Posted: Jul 24 2010, 03:15 PM


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If you're really interested in automotive setup, theory, aero and such, look into FSAE. If you have time, you might be able to get into a program, or at least search the web for an informational build on a program. I had a long talk with a few FSAE programs at the SCCA Northeastern Divisional Championship and the Pro Solo Tour this year and found it to be very informational. If I didn't travel with my job, I'd seriously want to get involved.
Kiroshino
  Posted: Jul 25 2010, 05:01 AM


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Thir13teen and I go to the same school, and he's part of FSAE. I tried joining last year, but they don't check their emails and haven't updated their website in years. According to Thir13teen, it's pretty much word of mouth to get in. Hoping to join this year, but we'll see how things work out since I've got a job as well to attend.