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Views: 531  ·  Replies: 10 
> Initial D Street Stage Dialogue translations?
Kalikedeshi
  Posted: Apr 28 2017, 09:36 PM


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Can anyone translate what the characters are saying in ID Street Stage?
yijiem
Posted: Aug 8 2017, 05:43 AM


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I am planning to do this for Initial D Arcade Stage 8. Apparently SEGA is no longer releasing the English version for the game? (correct me if I'm wrong)

This post has been edited by yijiem on Aug 8 2017, 05:44 AM
SonicSP
Posted: Aug 8 2017, 06:00 AM


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Yeah, since D5 they stopped doing that. Don't think

Only exception are the staff credits and DCoins screens, which are fully translated to English for EXP version of D8.

This post has been edited by SonicSP on Aug 8 2017, 06:05 AM
Falbere
Posted: Aug 8 2017, 06:59 AM


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How else are they going to make paying for things easier for them filthy foreigners?
yijiem
Posted: Aug 8 2017, 10:04 AM


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https://ukarcaderacers.wordpress.com/2014/0...tern-countries/

I guess those serious arcade games that require some knowledge of background are just not that popular in western countries? Culture difference? I don't have too much of background since I came from an eastern country. I won't say arcade games like ID were there everywhere, but it certainly outnumbers the machines that I can find here in NYC which is supposed to be a good place to bet.
SonicSP
Posted: Aug 8 2017, 01:13 PM


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Most of the problem is that arcades are much more bigger in Japan and some parts of Asia than in Weatern countries (it's not completely dead but it's fallen relatively more than Japan). Like arcades are still pretty huge in Japan.

The other, like the article says is just that the Japanese IPs aren't popular. Most of the games in the US are those with more familiar Western IPs, like Wheel of Fortune, Pac Man (very much still iconic there), Fast and Furious, etc. I swear those Fast and Furious machines were everywhere some years ago.

The different age demographic thing is kinda valid too, partly because Japan as a country is much much older. There are more serious investment games in Japan. I mean games like Initial D, Wangan, Gundam vs Gundam, Mai Mai and many others referenced require a save card and have online features associated. Western arcade games in general tends to be less sophisticated and is more about casual fun (but again, there are casual games in Japan).

Hell in the case of Initial D and Wangan, you can't access the true depth of the game without a card.

Anime is also a niche in the US, and to add to that Initial D is a fairly niche anime even if it's referenced once in awhile.

Of course, Sega Rally 3 and Daytona USA 3 did have US/English releases I think, so it's not all arcade games. I guess part of the appeal is that they feel more general and less Japanese-centric.

This post has been edited by SonicSP on Aug 8 2017, 01:24 PM
yijiem
Posted: Aug 9 2017, 05:49 AM


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I agree that Western arcade games tends to be in favor of casual games. But Japanese IP is still popular in the western world I guess? I just learned that PacMan is actually a Japanese IP! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pac-Man

Games like Mario Kart are still popular in places like Dave&Busters. Since the whole Arcade culture is sort of spreading from Japan(I might be wrong about this), it's common that people first play the game and then learn about the IP.
SonicSP
Posted: Aug 9 2017, 06:49 AM


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Pac Man I would say is one of the exceptions since it's a very iconic historical IP that even most non-gamers know in the West, due to its association with the early days of gaming.

Of course I should elaborate that when I say Japanese IPs in my previous post, I'm referring mainly to general anime and arcade stuff. Mainstream Japanese gaming IPs are still fairly popular for the most part. Mario Kart is helped by that it is also a very very popular mainstream game series with regular Western releases, even among casual gamers.

I wouldn't say modern arcade games are spreading from Japan though IMO (not anymore, it was true in the past however), it's more like they have two distinct markets - Western and Japanese and they mostly remain separate.

I visited Akihabara once some years back and I saw many many arcadegames that I've never seen, and my country in Asia has seen plenty of Japanese games that don't make it to the West. Some of the more well known arcade IPs will get imported (and I would include Initial D in that since it still gets imported unofficially in the US) but there are plenty of titles that most people outside Japan has never even heard off.

This post has been edited by SonicSP on Aug 9 2017, 06:58 AM
yijiem
Posted: Aug 10 2017, 06:59 PM


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Nice! Will definitely check it out next time I visit smile.gif

Btw, I am also wondering why SEGA no longer releases Initial d for console (ps4/xbox). Probably not selling well for their previous versions? Or the experience is bad on console? No console, no foreign arcade version, SEGA is just trying to keep the game only in Japan I guess... sleep.gif|||
SonicSP
Posted: Aug 10 2017, 10:41 PM


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Yes, if you love Japanese arcade games (or anime) you should try to visit Akihabara in Tokyo, Japan at least once in your lifetime. It's like an arcade heaven on Earth. Floors and floors of arcades in the whole town. Truly the arcade capital of the world.

As for why Sega doesn't release the games for console, I suspect that part or most of the reason is arcade exclusivity. Sega in theory would make much more money if the games are arcade exclusives since they earn a lot more direct revenue.

In order for the machines to have online access, arcades have to pay a monthly flat subscription fee plus a small precentage from the revenue of each race played on the machine. Now that D0 requires that you be online to even be able to use the card system, it's all but mandatory.

Taking this into account, it means that Sega gets a small cut for each game played, there is no reason for them to allow you to buy the game for a flat fee and allow you to play at home. This is not too unusual, arcade games rarely get home console ports these days including Wangan. The modern IDAS game structure is really more "games as a service" where the publisher have much more direct control and charges more ongoing revenue in the form of more microtransactions (DNET subscription service that gives extra features like teams and tachometer changes to players and DCoins in D8).

Some may argue that a "delayed exclusivity" might allow them to have the best of both worlds, something like Namco's Tekken 7 which was arcade exclusive for a good while. However Tekken is also a fairly big video game IP (mainstream English gaming sites for example would recognize Tekken, whereas they would never have heard off Initial D or Wangan), where the global mass markets sales of a release would make it worth it even if it costs them some cannabalization from the arcades.

Initial D by contrast is a fairly obsecure IP in the current climate, even in Japan (game is popular in arcades but the overall IP is not really hot property anymore). If Sega releases a console port now, not many people but the hardcore like us will buy it which would likely canabalize their arcade revenue to some extent but without significant upside from the console sale revenue due to the far lesser mass market penetration (compared to something like a Tekken 7).

For what it's worth, it should be noted that Sega still supports online multiplayer of Initial D Extreme Stage for the PS3 even after all these years as far as I know. So they're not totally anti-console for IDAS.

This post has been edited by SonicSP on Aug 11 2017, 05:09 AM
yijiem
Posted: Aug 11 2017, 07:24 AM


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Thanks for the great info!

I think whether the game is arcade exclusive or console exclusive or both depends on many factors. Like how the game performs financially in different models, a.k.a the pay-as-you-go model vs pay-upfront model, whether the game needs special hardware support to guarantee experience, and IP popularity... SEGA makes the decision to make ID arcade exclusive, while on the other hand, Capcom stops releasing arcade version for street fighter. I guess it bets more people will prefer playing it at home.